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State of Wyoming

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Jackson

 

Brian Beadles
Historic Preservation Specialist
(307) 777-8594

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  • George Washington Memorial Park

     

     
     

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    Also known as the Jackson Town Square, the historic site includes the park which occupies a full city block, an elk antler arch and a stone monument of John Colter, among other non-contributing features and utilitarian objects. Prior to the creation of the park, the town square served as an informal, ill-defined, and widely-used open area around which the town's retail businesses began to locate. As a result of citizen volunteers, local officials, and federal work-relief assistance, the open space was converted into George Washington Memorial Park. That conversion in the years 1932 to 1934 reflected the commitment of the town and its citizens to civic improvement, and in the ensuing years of its historic significance, 1934-1953, the park became a defining feature and signature element of the town of Jackson. Because of the social, economic, and cultural origins of the park, because of the variety of resources that came together for its creation, and because of its prominence in the community, the park has performed a central role in the community planning and development of Jackson.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Friday, December 05, 2003
     
    Location:
    Jackson
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1214  

     

  • Grace and Robert Miller Ranch

     

     
     

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    The Robert E. Miller Ranch is located approximately three miles north of the town of Jackson and is situated at the bottom of the west slope of the Gros Ventre Mountains with a commanding view of Jackson Hole and the Teton Mountain Range. The site consists of three historic structures which served as the residence of Robert E. Miller, the first superintendent of Teton National Monument. The property was later transferred to what would later become the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a component of the National Elk Refuge. The site is significant because of its association with the historic pattern of settlement in Jackson Hole and because of its association with conservation activities. An integral component of the Robert E. and Grace G. Miller homestead, two individual structures at the site were previously listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The ranch house and the barn, built between 1895 and 1898, and the Forest Service cabin together represent an important convergence of settlement, ranching, and conservation as distinct elements of the history of Jackson Hole.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Friday, January 11, 2002
     
    Location:
    Jackson
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE903  

     

  • Huff Memorial Library

     

     
     

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    The impressive building that housed the Huff Memorial Library, also known as the Teton County Library, in Jackson, Wyoming is a single story log building constructed between 1938 and 1940. The significance of this building rests in its association with the growth of the community in ways that reach beyond traditional conceptions of education, or even beyond economics and culture, ways that reflect community needs and participation and commitment. Many institutions such as libraries are public in name, but this one derived from the people throughout the community, including people from its most renowned leaders to its humblest citizens who shared in common their value of the written word.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Friday, December 05, 2003
     
    Location:
    Jackson
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1805  

     

  • Jackson Hole American Legion Post No. 43

     

     
     

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    Jackson Hole American Legion Post No. 43 is a single story building located one block north of the town square in Jackson, Wyoming. The building is significant for its association with events that have made a contribution to the broad patterns of history in the community. Organized in Jackson in 1920, the local post of the American Legion constructed its own building in 1928 and 1929 and both the institution and the building became centers of community activity. While on the national level the organization emerged especially as a force to press for specific policies on the part of the federal government, at the local level this post appears to have eschewed controversy and embraced all members of the community in its efforts to improve the circumstances of life in Jackson Hole. The building serving as home for Jackson Hole American Legion Post No. 43 has provided a broad range of community functions that have extended well beyond the political and economic agenda of the national organization. During the period of its historic significance, 1929-1953, this organization, and the building where it conducted its business, has reflected the shift from rural to urban leadership in the valley, has served as a central location of entertainment and recreation, has provided a forum for the investigation of issues critical not only to the community but to decision-makers in the U.S. Senate, has promoted the cause of education and library access in the growing community, and has established itself as an eminent, constant, and distinctive institution in community development. Each step of the way the post reflected fundamental contours of the broad patterns of history at the local level.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Friday, September 12, 2003
     
    Location:
    Jackson
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1213  

     

  • Miller Cabin

     

     
     

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    The Robert E. Miller Cabin complex consists of three historic buildings that served as the residence of Robert E. Miller, the first superintendent of Teton National Monument. The property was later transferred to what would later become the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a component of the National Elk Refuge. The site is significant because of its association with the historic pattern of settlement in Jackson Hole and because of its association with conservation activities. The ranch house, the Forest Service cabin, and the barn are integral to the Robert E. and Grace G. Miller Ranch, also listed on the National Register of Historic Places. They represent an important convergence of settlement, ranching, and conservation as distinct elements of the history of Jackson Hole.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Wednesday, April 16, 1969
     
    Location:
    Jackson
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE903  

     

  • St. John's Episcopal Church and Rectory

     

     
     

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    Located in Jackson, Wyoming, St. John's Episcopal Church is a one story log structure completed in 1916. St. John's Rectory was constructed in 1911 and is one of the largest and most significant log structures in all of Jackson Hole. The Church was an outgrowth of the mission work carried on in Jackson from 1908 to 1915. The role of the Episcopal Church in Jackson has always been a distinctive one. Services, church school, library facilities and Christian social gatherings added a great deal to the limited activities in town. The Rectory, or Hostel as it was originally called, was constructed under the guidance of Bishop Nathaniel Thomas. Episcopal church services were first held in Jackson in 1908, but with no regularity until the Rectory was built. Afterwards, priests came there not only to conduct services, but also to live. In the early years the hostel, or ''Rest House'' as it was often called, served in many capacities. Many ranchers and dudes of the early days were put up at the hostel because the ride to and from town was too long a trip for one day. The hostel has served as a community room or club room and was also used to accommodate primary classes when the population in the valley began to grow and the local schools became too crowded.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Friday, December 01, 1978
     
    Location:
    Jackson
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE912  

     

  • Van Vleck House and Barn

     

     
     

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    The Van Vleck House is a small one story log cabin located in Jackson, Wyoming. The building was built as a residential home in 1910-1911. The residential barn stands behind the house. Both structures are significant for their association with and representation of the earliest settlement of the town of Jackson in the early twentieth century. As the only original residential structures adjacent to the town square, the Van Vleck House and barn on the original lot represent the earliest history and development of this genuine old west agricultural community, which was later transformed by tourism.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Friday, September 15, 1995
     
    Location:
    Jackson
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1317  

     

  • Wort Hotel

     

     
     

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    The Wort Hotel has been known as ''The Heart of Jackson'' since 1941 and continues to provide special Wyoming hospitality to visitors, old timers and newcomers of Jackson Hole. The Wort Hotel is located at the southeast corner of Broadway and Glenwood Streets, one block west of the internationally recognized elk antler arches on the Jackson Town Square. The building is an eclectic style reminiscent of Medieval architecture, most significantly Tudor, based on its peaked roof line, gabled wall dormers and decorative half timbers applied to the second story stucco. Locally, it is also described as a Swiss-Alpine style. The Silver Dollar Bar and Grill can be entered by a hallway leading from the hotel lobby. Jackson's famous watering hole got its name in 1950 when a hand-crafted elongated ''S'' shaped bar, inlaid with 2,032 uncirculated 1921 silver dollars was installed. Mounted above the bar, echoing its ''S'' shape are 13 panels of a burnt leather mural by well-known western artist, Paul Clowes. Each of the panels depicts an authentic episode of Jackson Hole history. The Wort Hotel was constructed by brothers John and Jess Wort in 1941 in honor of their father, Charles Wort, who in the early 1900s envisioned an elegant hotel in Jackson Hole to house tourists and visitors to the area. It became the first luxury hotel in the Jackson Hole valley and remains today a famous Jackson landmark.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Thursday, December 09, 1999
     
    Location:
    Jackson
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1216  

     

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